Telehealth, A Psychologist’s Perspective: Getting Started

  I decided to provide telehealth, or telemental health, services to expand my practice, meet the expectations of my increasingly technology-savvy patient/client population, and to help meet the needs of local underserved populations.  I quickly learned that getting ready to start providing telehealth services requires some research and training – my “homework.” My first step was researching whether my licensing board allows, or at least does not forbid, telehealth.  In Minnesota, it is OK. Next, I researched  whether my contracted insurance companies cover telehealth services, and if so whether they have limitations on this coverage. One crucial question is whether

Innovator Interview #1, Brett Donnelly, PsyD, Acacia Counseling and Wellness

Innovator Interview #1, Brett Donnelly, PsyD, Acacia Counseling and Wellness

MHConcierge interviewed Brett Donnelly, PsyD, LP, co-owner of Acacia Counseling and Wellness.  Acacia has three clinics, two in California and one in Minneapolis, and is in the process of adding more clinics.  Acacia’s mission is to serve students, faculty and staff in university communities.  Brett used his unusual (for a psychologist) marketing background to develop Acacia’s services, and for ongoing refinement.  Acacia has a non-profit foundation to support students in need of financial assistance for mental health services.  Acacia also has strong social justice and “woke” values, and a thriving social media presence.

Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

“Intake of Raw Fruits and Vegetables Is Associated With Better Mental Health Than Intake of Processed Fruits and Vegetables” reports on a study using an online survey of 422 young adults in New Zealand and the US.  Raw Fruit and Vegetable Intake (RVI) was compared to processed (cooked and canned veggies) FVI using several mental health-related measures.  Raw FVI was found to significantly predict higher mental health outcomes.  The authors review studies of diet and mood, and theorize that their findings fit with evidence that cooking reduces some important nutrients in veggies, and these nutrients contribute to positive mental health. 

Depression and Mild Cognitive Impairment – treat depression to improve cognition

Depression and Mild Cognitive Impairment – treat depression to improve cognition

“Evaluation and Treatment of Depression May Reverse Memory and Cognitive Difficulties in Older Adults with Mild Cognitive Impairment”  reviews interesting research which found that older individuals with worse depression and mood symptoms are more likely to develop mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and to progress from MCI to dementia. The worse the symptoms of depression and mood disorder, the more likely the progression from MCI to dementia.