Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

“Intake of Raw Fruits and Vegetables Is Associated With Better Mental Health Than Intake of Processed Fruits and Vegetables” reports on a study using an online survey of 422 young adults in New Zealand and the US.  Raw Fruit and Vegetable Intake (RVI) was compared to processed (cooked and canned veggies) FVI using several mental health-related measures.  Raw FVI was found to significantly predict higher mental health outcomes.  The authors review studies of diet and mood, and theorize that their findings fit with evidence that cooking reduces some important nutrients in veggies, and these nutrients contribute to positive mental health. 

Research clarifies the actual benefits of having a pet: still good for you, just less than previously thought

Research clarifies the actual benefits of having a pet: still good for you, just less than previously thought

Published by the Wall Street Journal on 10-27-17 (MHConcierge tends to ignore the journals politics and political commentaries, and focus on the superb health, science, and technology reporting which appears to be free of political bias), “The Real Benefits of Pet Ownership; our animal friends may not make us healthier, but they earn in their keep in other ways.” This is an interesting and well with article that reviews the current research about the potential benefits of pets. Some of the older research nas not held up very well, but current research is refining our understanding of the potential benefits

Should habit change take on more than one habit at a time- research supports taking on more

The New York Times published “Out With the Old” on May 12, 2016. This article reports on interesting research published in March in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, “Pushing the Limits: Cognitive, Affective, and Neural Plasticity Revealed by an Intensive Multifaceted Intervention.” The entire original article is available online, but is fairly long and the NYT article provides an excellent summary.

Study finds psychological variables to be most important mortality predictors for most people

Psychological Science published “Think Fast, Feel Fine, Live Long A 29-Year Study of Cognition, Health, and Survival in Middle-Aged and Older Adults” online on 2-25-16.  This  article reports on a 29 year study of over 6,000 people which evaluated “the relative and combined influence of 65 mortality risk factors.”  The study found, “…two psychological variables—subjective health status and processing speed—were among the top predictors of survival.” Also, “relations between processing speed and mortality risk mainly hinge on pathologies that develop in mid- to late adulthood (i.e., rather than genetic precursors or early-life events)—although we cannot state this definitively because we