Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

“Intake of Raw Fruits and Vegetables Is Associated With Better Mental Health Than Intake of Processed Fruits and Vegetables” reports on a study using an online survey of 422 young adults in New Zealand and the US.  Raw Fruit and Vegetable Intake (RVI) was compared to processed (cooked and canned veggies) FVI using several mental health-related measures.  Raw FVI was found to significantly predict higher mental health outcomes.  The authors review studies of diet and mood, and theorize that their findings fit with evidence that cooking reduces some important nutrients in veggies, and these nutrients contribute to positive mental health. 

Health and wellness news: good news for coffee lovers and runners

Health and wellness news: good news for coffee lovers and runners

Health and wellness news:  good news for coffee lovers, continued, A Weapon Against Dementia in Your Coffee Pot (PsychiatricTimes.com, 4-6-17)  reports on recent research that finds caffeine to have significant protective properties for dementia.  It boosts the production of a protective enzyme that – at least in rats – is protective for Alzheimer, Parkinson and Huntington diseases. The optimal dose has not yet been determined.  And, An Hour of Running May Add 7 Hours to Your Life (New York Times, 4-12-17) builds on previous research that found that running, or jogging, no matter what the pace, reduced risk of premature

SAMHSA advocates that behavioral professionals discuss nutrition: part of integrated care

Why You Should Address Nutrition? was posted by email by SAMHSA on 3-30-17, and discusses why behavioral professionals, in addition to medical professionals, should discuss nutrition. From the posting: Eating healthy is as important to behavioral health as it is to physical health. What people eat can affect depression, anxiety, stress and sleep disorders. In addition, some psychotropic medications can contribute to weight gain, putting people with mental illness at higher risk for obesity and related conditions, including diabetes.   For the full message, read on.

Study: psychological benefits of increasing intake of fruit and veggies, results are heartening to patients

The American Journal of Public Health will publish “Evolution of Well-Being and Happiness After Increases in Consumption of Fruit and Vegetables” in the Aug. issue. This remarkable study followed over 12,000 Australian adults for 6 years.  The authors concluded, “Increased fruit and vegetable consumption was predictive of increased happiness, life satisfaction, and well-being.”  The study controlled for many important confounding variables, including income and personal characteristics.

Wellness issues: behavioral changes from a program that “prescribes” fruit and veggies

The New York Times published an article on 12-1-14 about an innovative program in New York which encourages children to increase their consumption of fruits and vegetables in order to respond to childhood health problems, including obesity and diabetes.  The article, “Prescribing Vegetables, Not Pills,” is by the highly regarded health journalist, Jane Brody.  She noted that this program is “a startingly simple idea to deal with complex problem,” and went on to report that outcomes research has found that after just four months in the program 40% of the participating children had a lowered BMI.   ——————————- In addition to