8 “do-able” things you can do to reduce stress, increase joy in life

8 “do-able” things you can do to reduce stress, increase joy in life

From NPR.org, an excellent summary of research on stressed people (caregivers for loved ones with dementia) that identifies ways to cope that make a difference, and are do-able. Take a moment to identify one positive event each day. Tell someone about the positive event or share it on social media. This can help you savor the moment a little longer. Start a daily gratitude journal. Aim to find little things you’re grateful for, such as a good cup of coffee, a pretty sunrise or nice weather. Identify a personal strength and reflect on how you’ve used this strength today or

Do you want more friends? Science has some tips to help.

Do you want more friends?  Science has some tips to help.

One of the most common problems that people in therapy want help with is making new friends, which can be very challenging these days. “How to Make Friends, According to Science” is a brief article that discusses what the social sciences can tell us about making friends, including: don’t discount your casual acquaintances; don’t forget about old friends that you have lost touch with – “rekindle old friendships”; it takes time to make new friends – “be patient”; and keep in mind that there are many others out there, probably in your social world, who also want to make new

Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

“Intake of Raw Fruits and Vegetables Is Associated With Better Mental Health Than Intake of Processed Fruits and Vegetables” reports on a study using an online survey of 422 young adults in New Zealand and the US.  Raw Fruit and Vegetable Intake (RVI) was compared to processed (cooked and canned veggies) FVI using several mental health-related measures.  Raw FVI was found to significantly predict higher mental health outcomes.  The authors review studies of diet and mood, and theorize that their findings fit with evidence that cooking reduces some important nutrients in veggies, and these nutrients contribute to positive mental health. 

Three articles with info for parents with troubled kids; family meals, anxiety, guilt

Associations Between Early Family Meal Environment Quality and Later Well-Being in School-Age Children reports on a study of 1492 children and their parents that found that children whose families eat meals together at age 6 have “higher levels of general fitness and lower levels of soft drink consumption, physical aggression, oppositional behavior, nonaggressive delinquency, and reactive aggression at age 10.” The authors recommend that health care professionals and social workers talk with parents about the importance of eating meals as a family as part of home-based interventions to promote healthy child development. This article comes to our attention courtesy of