Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

Raw Fruit and Veggies better for Mental Health Than Processed Fruit and Veggies

“Intake of Raw Fruits and Vegetables Is Associated With Better Mental Health Than Intake of Processed Fruits and Vegetables” reports on a study using an online survey of 422 young adults in New Zealand and the US.  Raw Fruit and Vegetable Intake (RVI) was compared to processed (cooked and canned veggies) FVI using several mental health-related measures.  Raw FVI was found to significantly predict higher mental health outcomes.  The authors review studies of diet and mood, and theorize that their findings fit with evidence that cooking reduces some important nutrients in veggies, and these nutrients contribute to positive mental health. 

Three articles with info for parents with troubled kids; family meals, anxiety, guilt

Associations Between Early Family Meal Environment Quality and Later Well-Being in School-Age Children reports on a study of 1492 children and their parents that found that children whose families eat meals together at age 6 have “higher levels of general fitness and lower levels of soft drink consumption, physical aggression, oppositional behavior, nonaggressive delinquency, and reactive aggression at age 10.” The authors recommend that health care professionals and social workers talk with parents about the importance of eating meals as a family as part of home-based interventions to promote healthy child development. This article comes to our attention courtesy of

Tips for Increasing Happiness – Resources for Therapists and Patients/Clients

Tips for Increasing Happiness – Resources for Therapists and Patients/Clients

“How to Be Happy” describes research done by behavioral (psychological) scientists who study what helps people to be happy.  They find that happiness does just come on it’s own, and there are some things that people can do to increase their happiness – or least the chances of being happier. Of course, there are some things that reduce changes of happiness, too.  The article discusses three categories of happiness resources: mind, body and environmental changes.

Insomnia update: tart cherry juice found to have remarkable benefit (but from small study)

Following up on last week’s posting about a sleep scientist’s advice opposing use of sleep medications, and advocating for naturalistic and psychological, here is another interesting article about research that finds that tart cherry do’s significantly increased sleep time for insomniacs. The ScienceBlog.com published “Montmorency Tart Cherry Juice Increased Sleep Time in Insomniacs” on 10-28-17.  The results were significant and found that the subjects who received the tart cherry juice treatment rated their sleep is significantly better, and were found to have actually slept on the average 84 more minutes than the control group.

Mindfulness benefits for infants and children: you don’t need to be a Zen monk to help your child

The New York Times posted “Mindfulness for Children” on 10-28-17. This is part of their ongoing Well blog series, which provides excellent summaries of recent research and developments of interest to the general population interested in health issues. This article reviews potential benefits of mindfulness training for children, including helping them learn self-control, soothe themselves when anxious, and can promote positive attitudes.