“Patient” or “Client”? – the American Psychological Association takes a stand, passes a resolution.

Do psychologists (and other behavioral professionals) have “patients” or “clients”? The American Psychological Association passed a resolution recommending that the answer depend upon the type of services provided.  If a psychologist is providing health services, such as psychotherapy, it’s best to use “patients,” according to a resolution passed by APA. However, if a psychologist works in an industrial/organizational, human resources, or other applied role, it makes more sense to say “clients.”

Michael DeSanctis, PhD, “What You Need to Know About Sleep Debt”

Michael DeSanctis, PhD, “What You Need to Know About Sleep Debt”

Sleep debt is common today, affecting millions of US adults at some point in their lives. You cannot re-finance or pay off this debt except by making sleep a priority in your life. Many Americans try to compress their sleep time as much as possible, thinking you can streamline the sleep process and squeeze more quality wake time into the 24-hour day. Doesn’t work that way. 7-9 hours of sleep on average for adults is recommended, based on a consensus of sleep professionals.

PSYCPACT update: report from MN Board of Psychology presentation, 5-17-19

I attended a presentation about PSYPACT for the Minnesota Board of Psychology on Friday, May 17.  Alex Segal, PhD, JD, presented on behalf of the PSYPACT parent organization, the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB).  He is a psychologist and attorney, and is the Direct of Professional Affairs at ASPPB.  He also was staff to the APA/ASPPB/The Trust (at that time, The Trust was APA’s medical malpractice organization) Joint Task Force on Telepsychology.  PSYPACT is an “interstate compact.”  This is a legal structure that was created by the US Constitution to allow states to negotiate form, legally binding

8 “do-able” things you can do to reduce stress, increase joy in life

8 “do-able” things you can do to reduce stress, increase joy in life

From NPR.org, an excellent summary of research on stressed people (caregivers for loved ones with dementia) that identifies ways to cope that make a difference, and are do-able. Take a moment to identify one positive event each day. Tell someone about the positive event or share it on social media. This can help you savor the moment a little longer. Start a daily gratitude journal. Aim to find little things you’re grateful for, such as a good cup of coffee, a pretty sunrise or nice weather. Identify a personal strength and reflect on how you’ve used this strength today or