“Patient” or “Client”? – the American Psychological Association takes a stand, passes a resolution.

Do psychologists (and other behavioral professionals) have “patients” or “clients”? The American Psychological Association passed a resolution recommending that the answer depend upon the type of services provided.  If a psychologist is providing health services, such as psychotherapy, it’s best to use “patients,” according to a resolution passed by APA. However, if a psychologist works in an industrial/organizational, human resources, or other applied role, it makes more sense to say “clients.”

8 “do-able” things you can do to reduce stress, increase joy in life

8 “do-able” things you can do to reduce stress, increase joy in life

From NPR.org, an excellent summary of research on stressed people (caregivers for loved ones with dementia) that identifies ways to cope that make a difference, and are do-able. Take a moment to identify one positive event each day. Tell someone about the positive event or share it on social media. This can help you savor the moment a little longer. Start a daily gratitude journal. Aim to find little things you’re grateful for, such as a good cup of coffee, a pretty sunrise or nice weather. Identify a personal strength and reflect on how you’ve used this strength today or

PSYPACT, what you need to know, and should MN be part of it?

PSYPACT, what you need to know, and should MN be part of it?

PSYPACT is the Psychology Interjuristictional Compact. It involves the formal approval of a “model act” developed by the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards (ASPPB) to allow approved psychologists  from a PSYPACT state to legally practice telepsychology over state lines and to provide temporary in-person services in another PSYPACT state – without having to be licensed in the second state.

“Top Doctor” awards – scam, or legitimate? ProPublica researches, concludes, “Scam!”

“Top Doctor” awards – scam, or legitimate?  ProPublica researches, concludes, “Scam!”

MHConceirge previously posted about “top doctors award” plaques, after getting a phone call from a person who sounded profoundly bored and tried to sell me a plaque for a couple of hundred dollars. Since I practice in Minnesota and the company was located in another state, I wondered how the company could possibly establish that I am a “top doctor.” A few minutes of online research located an ABC News investigative report from 2012 about these “top doctors” plaques. The report found several, frankly, fishy examples of these awards, such as an MD with a history of dental school, but